Green eggs and slam (… it in the recycling)

17 April 2014 by
Image: http://www.revitalscakes.com via Wikimedia Commons

Image: http://www.revitalscakes.com via Wikimedia Commons

Can you recycle eggstra this Easter?

Our chocolate eggs at this time of year create an estimated 3,000 tonnes of rubbish to deal with.

While manufacturers say they are doing lots to reduce packaging around those brightly coloured chocolate eggs, you’re still likely to be left with a small mountain of cardboard, plastic and foil once the choc has been chomped.

Be a good egg – recycle it

Thankfully, the Recycle for Dorset service now lets residents in Christchurch, East Dorset, North Dorset, Purbeck and part of West Dorset recycle card and rigid plastic packaging (if it’s like a plastic tub or tray, you can recycle it).

Aluminium foil can be taken to some mini recycling centres, where it is collected by charities.

And supermarket chain Sainsbury’s has announced that 50 of its stores will have Easter egg recycling points.

Make your own ‘green eggs’

Making your own Easter eggs is green, tasty, and easy than you think. You can even reuse the plastic from past eggs as a mould.

Avoid egg-cessive packaging

Look for eco-friendly Easter eggs where there is little to no plastic, and the packaging fits snugly around the egg.

 

 

After the storms

27 February 2014 by

The recent storms have left a trail of destruction for many households.  Here are some tips to help you with the clear-up:

Storm damage

Fallen tree

Picture courtesy of Newbiggin Hall Scouts (Wikimedia Commons)

If you have a garden waste collection, you can use it for leaves, twigs and branches less than 15cm diameter and short enough to fit in your bin. You can take bigger items, such as logs, to your local household recycling centre (HRC). Please note restrictions on vans may apply but small trailers are allowed.

Beware rogue traders. Make sure any tree surgeons who come calling have the proper qualifications and are licensed to carry and dispose of any waste. Unscrupulous traders made also be fly-tippers.  Check trading standards’ Buy With Confidence list of approved traders.

Clearing up after flooding

floods musicians 1

Picture courtesy of Peter Cooper (Wikimedia Commons)

If you are unfortunate enough to have been flooded, read Dorset councils’ flooding information and advice, including Public Health England’s advice on clearing up after floods.

Please take extra care and wear gloves when handling any goods that has been contaminated by flood water.

Home contents insurance, if you have it, should cover the costs of disposing of and replacing household items.  Waste disposal should be carried our by a licensed waste carrier.

You can also request a bulky household waste collection or use your local household recycling centre.  House clearances should be done by a specialist contractor.

Disposing of sandbags

Read the Environment Agency’s advice about what to do with sandbags after flooding.

Our general advice is as follows:

Unused sandbags (not contaminated by floodwater)

If you have space, store them in case you need them again. Alternatively, empty the sand (dig it into the garden, if you have one) and put the empty sack in the household rubbish bin, or take it to a household recycling centre.

Used sandbags (contaminated by floodwater)

Handle the bags with care using gloves and take them to a household recycling centre.  Bags filled with sand can be placed in the rubble skip. Gel bags should be put in the landfill skip.

Do not put contaminated sand or bags in your household waste collection.

Have a green Christmas – recycle more!

20 December 2013 by

Jingle All The Way to the Recycling Bin

The festive season results in an estimated 3 million tonnes of waste in the UK  (Institute of engineering and technology, 2011).

Follow these simple tips to turn Christmas into a recycling opportunity and reduce the amount of waste your household produces:

  • Send e-cards, or donate your card money to charity
  • Turn this year’s Christmas cards into gift tags for next year
  • Recycle any cards which can’t be reused in your kerbside recycling collection
  • Use re-usable gift bags or boxes instead of wrapping paper
  • Buy unpackaged fruit and vegetables
  • Home compost your fruit and vegetable peelings
  • The average grocery bill for Christmas is £169. Planning for Christmas helps everyone save time and money. Use the Love Food Hate Waste online portion planner whether you’re cooking for family or a party
  • Use up leftovers and freeze food that can’t be eaten
  • Recycle any unavoidable food waste using your food waste collection, if you have one
  • Re-use plastic shopping carrier bags, or use reusable bags, to carry your Christmas shopping
  • Buy a re-usable artificial tree or a potted real tree that can be planted in the garden or reused next year
  • Get your Christmas tree collected for composting, if available in your area
  • Send gift tokens to help reduce waste and allow recipients to choose their ideal gift
  • Buy rechargeable batteries, and recycle used household batteries using your red bag at the kerbside or at your local Household Recycling Centre
  • Recycle your old Christmas lights, or any other electrical or electronic items at your local household recycling centre

Find out more information about waste and recycling services over the Christmas and New Year period.

Post-storm garden clear-up? Recycle it…

28 October 2013 by

In the garden (large version)

If your garden is littered with leaves, twigs and branches following the stormy weather, remember there are lots of ways to recycle that organic garden material.

The Dorset Waste Partnership’s 11 household recycling centres accept garden waste, as well as any garden furniture that may be beyond repair.

And if you live in an area where the Recycle for Dorset service has been introduced and have paid for the optional garden waste collection service, you can put leaves, twigs and branches less than six inches thick into you garden waste wheelie bin.

Garden waste can also be collected in West Dorset and Weymouth and Portland using authorised sacks.

The garden waste we collect at recycling centres and the kerbside is recycled in Dorset to make compost and other soil improvers.

Stormy weather and bin collections

28 October 2013 by

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Bin collections across Dorset may happen later in the day in some areas today because of fallen trees and flooding following this morning’s strong winds and heavy rain.

Dorset Waste Partnership crews are working hard to complete today’s collection rounds as quickly as possible and expect to finish them by the end of the day.  We will provide updates here when we have them.

We appreciate your patience. Please take your containers back in once they have been emptied to avoid them being blown around.

All household recycling centres are open as normal.

Take care out there!

 

Recycling centres to close earlier for winter

23 October 2013 by

household recycling centre cardboard box

Dorset’s 11 household recycling centres (HRCs) will close an hour earlier from Friday 1 November.

Due to the shorter days, the centres will be open between 9am and 5pm seven days a week until April.

The only exception is Bridport HRC, which is open between 10am and 4pm on Saturdays and closed on Sundays all year round. The South Street site has the same opening hours as the other HRCs on weekdays.

The last chance to make use of the later closing time of 6pm will be Thursday 31 October.

You can find your nearest household recycling centre at our website.

 

Come along to Give or Take Day on Portland

23 September 2013 by

Give or Take day (large version)

Get rid of reusable items you no longer need and pick up something you do at the next Give or Take Day on Saturday 28 September at the Brackenbury Centre, Fortuneswell, Portland.

The free event is being run by Dorset Waste Partnership and Synergy Housing’s Portland Neighbourhood Panel.

It takes place between 9.30am and 12noon.  Items you would like to give away can be dropped off at the centre any time between 9.15am and 11.30am.

Give or Take Days help to encourage reuse in the community and reduce the amount of waste sent to landfill.  Even if you have nothing to bring along, you are more than welcome to come and take what you fancy on the day.

You can bring:

  • Books
  • Toys
  • Clothes
  • Tools
  • Bric-a-brac
  • Kitchenware
  • Small furniture
  • Jewellery
  • Bikes and bike parts
  •  Plants and gardening equipment
  • And working electrical equipment

The only rule is it must be able to fit in a car.

Staff from the Dorset Waste Partnership will be on hand with information on local recycling and waste reduction schemes and refreshments will be available to purchase on the day.

Roadshow rolls into Wareham

13 September 2013 by

Team pic for blog

The next Recycle for Dorset roadshow will be in Wareham tomorrow (Saturday 14 September).

We’ll be in the Corn Exchange at the Town Hall between 10am and 1pm.

Over the last week we have  been to the Dorset County Show in Dorchester, held roadshows in Crossways, Swanage and Wool and attended Poundbury Residents’ Association to talk about the new collection service coming to Purbeck and part of West Dorset next March.

If you live in the area and have missed the roadshows so far, don’t worry. There are events in Bere Regis, Corfe Castle, Upton and Dorchester still to come. You can find the full list of Recycle for Dorset roadshows here.

Which plastics can I recycle?

13 September 2013 by

margarine tub for blog

If you live in Christchurch, East Dorset or North Dorset, you can recycle plastic bottles, pots, tubs and trays in your bin with a green lid.

See our web page and leaflet about which plastics can be recycled using the ‘recycle for Dorset’ collection service.

The service is being rolled out across Dorset by 2015 and is coming to Purbeck and part of West Dorset next March.

Help turn the tide on littered beaches in Dorset

9 September 2013 by

Warbarrow Beach clean  April 2013 c Mark Fisher

The Dorset Wildlife Trust is inviting volunteers to a beach clean at Worbarrow Bay at 10am on Sunday 15 September.

The event aims to try and combat the major litter problems affecting the area.  Litter can be found on the beach at busy times of the year and during storms, and not only ruins the wonderful landscape of Dorset’s coast, but is potentially damaging to our precious marine environment.

Find out more about how to get involved.


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